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The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa®Coffee (Q&A)

You can buy Go Africa Coffee at:  www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore

 

The types of Coffee Beans used in Go Africa®Coffee

We have received so many inquiries regarding which beans are used in Go Africa Coffee. Since we source are beans from the following countries: (Ethiopia, Kenya, Côte d’Ivoire, Tanzania, Cameroon, and Democratic Republic of the Congo) the short answer is it depends.

images-4We have asked our resident Coffeelogist and Chief Roaster, Losseni Kone, to help provide an answer.

Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica” However, Coffee is much more complex than just type of Coffee.

 

Below is a list of Countries and Types of beans sourced from the country for Go Africa Coffee. Keep in mind a Country can source more than one type of bean:

  • images-2Ethiopia: (Arabica, Sidamo (Yirgachefe and Guji))
  • Kenya: (Bourbon, French Mission)
  • Côte d’Ivoire (Arabica, Gros Idente, Excelsea, Kouilou and Petit Indenize)
  • Tanzania: (Robusta)
  • Cameroon: (Arabica)
  • Democratic Republic of the Congo: (Robusta)

 

 

Below is a detail description of each type and subclass of Coffee Beans grown in the various regions of Africa.

 coffee-615

Not all of Africa’s coffee production is limited to Robusta, however. Here’s an overview of the different coffee varieties that are grown frequently across the African continent (keep in mind that while some of these coffees are considered single origin in nature, most like Arabica and Robusta are not):

  • Sidamo:A type of Arabica (which you can find elsewhere in this list) grown as a single origin coffee source in Sidamo, Ethiopia, this variety of coffee is a small bean that produces a rich, spicy and almost chocolatey flavor. Individual types of Ethiopian Sidamo include Yirgachefe and Guji, both known to be of high quality. Another type of Ethiopian coffee is Harar, which is another Arabica but not grown in Sidamo. More on these types of coffees later.
  • Liberica:Coffea Liberica is a species separate from Arabica as well. It typically grows in the western areas of Africa – most notably Liberia. Liberica’s taste is closer to Robusta than that of Arabica, and the beans grow on trees that can grow as high as 10 to 15 meters tall.
    Gros Idente: Similar to Liberica, Gros Idente coffee is grown in large trees in the western areas of Africa, such as the Ivory Coast.
  • Arabica:Yes, for all of our talk about Robusta growing in Africa, it can be easy to forget that Arabica coffee is also grown in Africa. Typically, the environments suited for growing Arabica in Africa are in mountainous areas – places like the mainland of the Ivory Coast and Cameroon are typical spots where Arabica coffee is grown. only-on-amazon-gacoffee
  • Excelsea:Like Liberica coffee, these trees grow high. In fact, they are also grown in the Ivory Coast which contributes to much of their similarities to Liberica and Gros Idente coffees.
  • Robusta:Much of the African environment is suitable for Robusta growing, typically the lower-lying areas in the equatorial regions of Africa. Robusta is grown just about everywhere from Madagascar to Gabon – even if Vietnam is a leading producer of Robusta coffee, its African roots are hard to shake off.
  • Kouilou and Petit Indenize:Grown inland along the Ivory Coast, these are actually smaller coffee trees.
  • Bourbon:This type of coffee was already mentioned before, but its influence in African coffee is difficult to understate. Bourbon was planted in Reunion – an island off the eastern coast of Madagascar – in the 18th century. The type of coffee then mutated, producing Bourbon coffee, which was then moved around the world and cultivated in different areas.
  • French Mission:This refers to a type of Bourbon coffee that was planted by French missionaries in areas of East Africa around the turn of the 20th century. A Kenyan type of this coffee known as K7 is also grown in Africa.
  • Mayaguez:Another subset of Bourbon coffee, this coffee is grown in Rwanda. Typically, the Bourbon coffees planted in Africa are spread throughout the eastern portions of the continent and Madagascar.

Considering the degree of geographical, environmental, and climate differences on a large continent like Africa, it’s not surprising that so many different varieties of coffee are produced there to some degree – including the world-popular Arabica.images-4

 

 

Coffee aficionados of all levels have without a doubt heard the words “Robusta” or “Arabica”. If you aren’t familiar with either, these two terms describe the two different species of beans grown commercially. They are the same in that when harvested, roasted and eventually brewed to become that magical thing we call coffee. However, that’s where the similarities end. Robusta and Arabica differ when it comes to taste, growing environments and quality:

Taste

Robusta has a neutral to harsh taste range and is often likened to having an “oatmeal-like” taste. When unroasted, the smell of Robusta beans is described as raw-peanutty.

Arabicas, on the other hand, have a very wide taste range (depending on its varietal). The range differs from sweet-soft to sharp-tangy. When unroasted, Arabica beans smell like blueberries. Their roasted smell is described as perfumey with notes of fruit and sugar tones.

Growing environments

Robusta coffee beans come from a resilient plant that is able to be grown in low altitudes of 200-800 meters. Robusta beans aren’t very susceptible to damage done by pests. Additionally, they produce more finished product per acre and require fairly low production costs.

Contrariwise, Arabica coffee beans are fragile and must grow in cool, subtropical climates.  Arabica beans also need a lot of moisture, rich soil, shade and sun. Because of their fragility, Arabica beans are vulnerable to attack from various pests and can be damaged by cold temperatures or poor handling. This type of bean also needs to be grown at a higher elevation (600-2000 meters).

42528010 – variety of cups of coffee on coffee beans background

Which bean is better? 

No contest!  If you had to choose between an Arabica bean and a Robusta bean, it’s important to always choose Arabica.images-1

Robusta fosters use mono-cropping, the practice of growing the same plant every year in one place. It yields more space since it involves clear-cutting the forest for the crop. Because Robusta is more a resilient plant than the delicate Arabica, it can be grown in more places. Large coffee companies buy huge amounts of rainforest, clear-cut the land and plant Robusta beans. Robusta is often mixed with Arabica,  allowing the coffee companies to save a pretty penny and serve you a crappy cup. Not to mention, mono-cropping, when done excessively, also erodes soil and demolishes nutrients making the soil nearly unusable.

 

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Introducing Go Africa Coffee in new 5 Ibs and 4 oz bags sizes on Amazon

We are happy to introduce Go Africa Coffee in new 5 Ibs and 4 oz  bag sizes. visit www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore  or wwww.GoAfricaStore.com 

The new bags provide the following benefits:

  • Go Africa Coffee, 5-pound bag: Designed for the restaurants, businesses, special events and other activities where a large amount of coffee is required at a competitive price. Special delivery and purchasing options are available. please email such requests to coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or call 646-502-9778 ext 8004
  • Go Africa Coffee, 4oz bag: designed for the person who consumes a small of coffee per week or would like super fresh experience by opening a new bags of coffee often. Perfect for gift giving.only-on-amazon-gacoffee

A complete listing of all bags sizes available for purchase are below:

  • Go Africa Coffee, 4oz bag: designed for the person who consumes a small of coffee per week or would like super fresh experience by opening a new bags of coffee often. Perfect for gift giving.
  • Go Africa Coffee, 8oz bag: Designed for the person who consumes about 2-3 cups of coffee per day and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time. Also perfect for gift giving
  • Go Africa Coffee, 12oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes about 2-3 cups of coffee per day and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time. Also perfect for gift giving
  • Go Africa Coffee, 16oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes a large amount of coffee every 1 -2 weeks and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time.  Special delivery and purchasing options are available. please email such requests to coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or call 646-502-9778 ext 8004
  • Go Africa Coffee, 32oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes a very large amount of coffee every 1 -2 weeks and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time.  Special delivery and purchasing options are available. please email such requests to coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or call 646-502-9778 ext 8004
  • Go Africa Coffee, 5-pound bag: Designed for the restaurants, businesses, special events and other activities where a large amount of coffee is required at a competitive price.  Special delivery and purchasing options are available. please email such requests to coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or call 646-502-9778 ext 8004

Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide. You can reach us at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or call 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at GoAfricaStore.com  or www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore


Posted on

Living and understanding the Go Africa Coffee Experience

Visit us at www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore

 

We at Go Africa Coffee have endeavored to evolve the Coffee experience similarly to how wine has evolved over the past 25 years.

In this regard, we have started our production processes with Premium quality whole beans from Africa.

We have advanced our preparation and production processes to perfection. Creating the prefect Coffee beverage for all occasions.14368783_1177380212334387_4253106528238736282_n

We have provided the consumer with optimum choices in how they purchase Coffee Beans for example we offer the following product sizes that are designed to fit your lifestyle and consumption of Coffee:

  • Go Africa Coffee, 4oz bag: designed for the person who consumes a small of coffee per week or would like super fresh experience by opening a new bags of coffee often. Perfect for gift giving.
  • Go Africa Coffee, 8oz bag: Designed for the person who consumes about 2-3 cups of coffee per day and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time. Also perfect for gift giving
  • Go Africa Coffee, 12oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes about 2-3 cups of coffee per day and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time. Also perfect for gift giving
  • Go Africa Coffee, 16oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes a large amount of coffee every 1 -2 weeks and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time.
  • Go Africa Coffee, 32oz bag: Designed for the person, family or group who consumes a very large amount of coffee every 1 -2 weeks and desires the freshest cup of coffee all the time.
  • Go Africa Coffee, 5-pound bag: Designed for the restaurants, businesses, special events and other activities where a large amount of coffee is required at a competitive price.

14231374_1171557406250001_5781710130774112732_oAdditionally, we have reviewed several Coffee and espresso makers in order for each person to consume Go Africa Coffee in a manner that is customized for the consumer to make the choice that is best for them and how they consume a fine beverage such as Go Africa Coffee.

 

The sections below do not constitute an endorsement of a particular product, rather the sections are designed to provide the consumer some direction in their coffee consumption experience.

 

 

We hope that this was helpful.

Enjoy your Go Africa Coffee Experience!

 

Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide. You can reach us at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at GoAfricaStore.com  or www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore

 


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How to Brew Coffee with the French Press (how to Video) and instructions

buy Go Africa Coffee at www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore or www.GoAfricaStore.com

AT A GLANCE

  • Total brew time: 4:30
  • Yield: 1-3 short mugs
  • Mugs per Craft Coffee bag: 6
  • Cup characteristics: Heavy and robust

WHAT YOU NEED

  • French press
  • Craft Coffee beans (see below for amount)
  • Water (see below for amount)
  • Stirring utensil
  • Kettle (gooseneck preferred)
  • Timer
  • Mug
  • Burr grinder (recommended)
  • Scale (recommended)

MEASUREMENTS

French Press Size 3-Cup 4-Cup 8-Cup
Coffee 17 grams (2-3 tbsp) 27 grams (4-5 tbsp) 54 grams (8-10 tbsp)
Water 275 mL, plus additional for pre-heating 430 mL, plus additional for pre-heating 860 mL, plus additional for pre-heating

BEFORE YOU BREW

  • Make sure your French press has been thoroughly cleaned since you last used it. Any old grounds stuck in the mesh filter will ruin your coffee with bitter flavors.
  • For best results, we strongly recommend starting with whole bean coffee and grinding with a burr grinder immediately before brewing. If you grind your coffee too soon, it will quickly lose many of the compounds that give it such delightful aromas and flavors.
  • While it may seem complicated, we think using a scale actually makes brewing easier by taking any guesswork out of the equation.
Step 1

Heat your water to 205 degrees by bringing it to a boil and letting it sit for 30 seconds.

Step 2

Fill your French press about one-quarter full with hot water and press the plunger all the way down. Swirl the hot water around inside the French press for about 10 seconds, then pull the plunger up and remove the lid. Discard the rinse water.

Step 3

If using pre-ground coffee skip to Step 4. Otherwise, weigh out your whole bean coffee and grind it on a coarse setting.

Step 4

Pour your ground coffee into the French Press and gently shake it back and forth to settle the grounds.

Step 5

Time: 0:00-0:30

Pour about half of your hot water evenly over the grounds. This step is called the bloom. Hot water forces the ground coffee to release trapped gases, leading to expansion of the coffee and wonderful aromas for you to enjoy. During the bloom, a thick “crust” of coffee grounds will also form.

Start your timer once you’ve finished pouring.

Step 6

Time: 0:30-0:35

Once your timer hits 30 seconds, stir the coffee gently for 5 seconds to break up the crust and mix the grounds evenly with the water.

Step 7

Time: 0:35-4:00

Pour the remaining half of your hot water over the coffee. Place the lid on your French press with the plunger pulled all the way up. Let the coffee steep until your timer reads 4:00.

Step 8

Time: 4:00-4:15

Slowly press the plunger all the way down to filter the grounds from the coffee. Pour the coffee immediately into your mug – if it sits for too long in your French press it will turn bitter.

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How to Grind Coffee

Buy Go Africa Coffee at www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore or www.GoAfricaStore.com

KNOW YOUR GRIND

Your coffee grind has a big impact on the quality of your brew. What’s the right grind size? It depends on how you brew your coffee! And since there are a lot of different ways to brew a delicious cup, we decided to make you this handy guide so you could explore them all.

For the examples provided we used a burr grinder, which is great because it gives a nice consistent grind. But if you only have a blade grinder, don’t despair – just get as close as possible. We’ve heard that giving a blade grinder a good shake while grinding can help even things out.

DID YOU KNOW?

The oils that give a coffee its most beautiful notes evaporate very quickly after you grind the beans. So, for the most delicious cup, try grinding just enough for what you’re about to brew.

See our guides to learn how to brew the perfect cup, every time.

Coffee Grinders:

It’s practically unanimous: every great cup of coffee starts with freshly ground coffee. And when I say fresh, I mean grinding your beans just moments before brewing. Too much trouble, you say? Nonsense! Poppycock! Where shall we begin?

We’ll start with the two basic types of grinders and the notable variations within.

• Blade Grinders

Blade grinder for coffee beans. Don't use it.

That high-speed whir heard round the world each morning is a blade grinder. These are the cheapest grinders for general-purpose coffee making. Blade from coffee grinder. Hacks and dices your coffee beans.They come with perky names like Krups or Braun. You probably have one. You shouldn’t. Perhaps you should relegate it to grinding Grandpa’s gruel. They can be very handy but they are not always precise and I do not recommend them. They horribly hack and slice your beans, leaving an uneven grind with course and fine particles in the same batch. The motors run hot; grinding too long can scorch the coffee.

Chunky uneven coffee grinds from a blade coffee grinder.

• Burr Grinders

For a step up in precision, now we’re moving in the right direction, tally-ho! Burr grinders are the answer to a more perfect union of bean and grind. Disk (a.k.a. plate) and conical burr grinders are your basic choices. Flat disk grinders use two spinning disks to smash the coffee into precise uniform grinds. Precision is good for home use; you can even get a truly fine espresso grind. But, alas, they can also run hot and, if not careful, can scorch the beans.

• Conical Burr Grinders

Baratza conical burr coffee grinder. We love them.Burr from a coffee grinder.

 

These are a bit more expensive, but are the choice of both coffee professionals and enthusiasts alike and well worth the price. These are the workhorses. Precision grinds, even for Turkish coffee, and a slow, cool motor.

Fresh ground coffee from burr coffee grinder. Precision coffee grinds.

Turkish hand grinder also used as a pepper mill.

• Hand Grinders

Manual hand coffee grinder with drawer.

If you’re both counting pennies and are also in need of a way to work out your flabby upper arms, perhaps you could try a hand grinder. They work on the same principle, except your arm substitutes for an electric motor. Watch those biceps bulge! The trouble here is that it takes an awful lot of effort to get even a small brew under way and in that time you could be drinking coffee.

 

The Various Grinds:

Coarse coffee grind example. Used for French Press.

• Coarse

This type of grind leaves the largest granules of coffee and is preferred for French Presses (a.k.a. plungers) or the percolator method of brewing.

 

Medium coffee grind example. Used for Drip and pour-over method.

• Medium

Medium grinds have a consistency of granulated sugar and are primarily recommended for vacuum and certain types of drip coffee makers. Because of its versatile size, it can also be used for other brewing methods, but not espresso.

 

Fine coffee grind example. Used for Espresso.

• Fine

Also known as an espresso grind, this is a grind with a powdery/mealy consistency used in espresso makers and Neapolitan flip-drips though electric drip and filter brews can use it as well.

 

Super Fine Coffee grind example. Used for Turkish Coffee.

• Pulverized

Like fine flour, this extremely fine grind is the province of Turkish coffee and usually needs to be ground in a special grinder.

 

 

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The Ultimate Iced Coffee Recipe

visit www.amazon.com/shops/GoAfricaStore  or & www.GoAfricaStore.com

Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide. You can reach us know at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at wwww.GoAfricaStore.com

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“Cold-brewed http://www.chicagobearsjerseyspop.com coffee poured over coffee ice Africa? cubes makes the best iced coffee. It queremos takes a bit of planning, but its full, rich flavor makes the wait Hello worthwhile. Sports The ideal coffee for the this cold Things drink is a blend of mid-roasted beans MOBILE: with moderate acid. Using a dark roast and beans high in acid produces a sharper, more bitter result.”

Ingredients

 

Ultimate Iced Coffee

 

 

 

 

 


Posted on

What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?

Try Go Africa Coffee. Post The lowest Priced premium Coffee Avaible on amazon.com and at www.GoAfricaStore.com
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What kind of coffee is produced in Africa?
Most African countries produce Robusta coffee, with a few having a mix of both Robusta and Arabica varieties. Countries producing Arabica coffee, especially the Colombian Mild will have a windfall in export earnings, which cheap mlb jerseys may lead to increased investments to boost output.
african coffee growing regions

Africa is home to many of the finest African coffee beans in the world, fromEthiopia and Kenya in the East to Rwanda where top для quality Arabica beans are cultivated to West African countries including Senegal and Cameroon where robusta coffee beans are mostly grown.

We’ll look briefly at some of the regions in this article: Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania and Malawi. Though to be fair, coffee beans from Africaare widely cultivated throughout the continent, and even grows wild in many areas.

Ethiopia: Harrar, Ghimbi and Yirgacheffe

Ethiopia has three main regions that produce African coffee beans: Harrar, Ghimbi and Sidamo, or Yirgacheffe. Harrar beans come from wholesale nfl jerseys small farms and are dry-processed. They are labeled “longberry” for large and “shortberry” for wholesale jerseys small or Mocha (which is the size of a Lifting peaberry).

The Ethiopian coffee has a strong dry edge, wine-like to fruity acidity, a rich aroma and heavy in body. In the best crops, you can Know smell blueberries or blackberries. Ethiopian is often used in cheap jerseys free shipping espresso blends in order the capture the aromatics in the crema (the thin layer of foam atop an espresso).

Ghimi and Yirgacheffe produce dla washed coffees. koniec The Ghimbi beans cheap nfl jerseys grown in western parts are more balanced, heavier and longer lasting body than the Harrars. The Yirgacheffe coffee bean wholesale mlb jerseys is the most flavored of all коктейля the 11月の月替わり献立 霜月の膳 一膳 2,900円(昼のみ限定食) Ethiopian beans, grown in the southern part of the country. Mild, fruity and aromatic, you may wholesale nba jerseys see it labeled Sidamo, which refers to the district where it is grown and harvested.

Uganda: Shade grown

Uganda produces mostly Robusta beans that are typically used in instant coffees but the Arabica beans it does produce are similar to Kenyan world! coffee. The best Ugandan coffee comes from the western slopes of Mt. Elgon called Bugishu.

Robusta has been in Uganda for centuries and wild varieties of it still grow in Uganda’s rain forests. Both Robusta and Arabica trees are grown in the shade of banana trees and harvested about twice a year. 300,000 farmers grow coffee, which makes up 95% of the country’s exports.

Ugandan farmers grow mostly Robusta since it is easier for farmers with little money for cheap nba jerseys equipment and none to hire help. The more well-off farmers can afford to farm Arabica, which is more work and more expensive but also pays off better. Ugandan Arabica is of medium intensity, sweet with a hint of the rustic, has a good body that is husky yet clean vom and makes an interesting espresso.


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20 Things You Didn’t Know About… Coffee (discover.com)

Try Go Africa Coffee. Go Africa Coffee is sold exclusively on Amazon nationwide. You can reach is at coffee_cust@goafricastore.com or 646-502-9778 ext 8004 or at www.GoAfricaStore.com

or at https://www.amazon.com/Go-Africa-Coffee-Whole-Bean/dp/B01FPXJAJI/ref=sr_1_2_s_it?s=grocery&ie=UTF8&qid=1470347389&sr=1-2&keywords=go+africa+coffee

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1. Forget 5-Hour Energy. The original pick-me-up may have come from the nomadic Oromo of Ethiopia, who made energy bars from ground coffee beans and animal fat sometime in the first millennium.

2.
Around A.D. 1000, Arab traders brought coffee beans home from Africa and started boiling them into a drink they called qahwa. wholesale MLB jerseys Translation: “that which prevents sleep.”

3.
Fast-forward to the 1930s, when German physician Max Gerson began promoting daily coffee enemas to detoxify the liver, stimulate metabolism, and cure cancers.

4.
More recently, Britain’s Prince Charles has raved about coffee enemas, and wholesale nfl jerseys Amazon.com sells DIY kits.

5.
But be warned: The National Cancer Institute says Gerson’s claims are unsupported, and the American Cancer Society cautions that illness and death can result from contaminated coffee enema equipment, Innovation Vet depleted electrolytes, and punctured intestinal walls.

6.
Have a cup instead. In 2011, WE the Harvard School of Public Health reported that in a 22-year study of nearly 48,000 men, those drinking six or more cups daily were about 60 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer.

7.
A 2008 study at Sweden’s Lund University demonstrated that drinking coffee lowers the risk of breast cancer, at least for women who have a relatively common variant of the gene CYP1A2, which helps to metabolize both estrogen and coffee.

8.
But what really grabbed the public’s attention that year was cup size. The same Swedish team found a correlation between women with the genetic variation who drink three or more cups of coffee a day and smaller breasts.

9.
Volume may be the least of coffee drinkers’ worries. In 2009, psychologists from the U.K.’s Durham University observed that students who drank three cups daily were three times more likely to hear voices and have out-of-body experiences.

 0. Bach voiced his love of coffee in a cantata. With libretto by Christian Friedrich Henrici, the Kaffeekantatewas first performed in Leipzig, Germany, sometime between 1732 and 1735.

11.
 “Father, don’t be so severe! / If I can’t drink / My bowl of coffee three times daily / Then in my torment I will shrivel up / Like a piece of roast goat,”

By Rebecca Coffey|Monday, September 29, 2014

espresso
nimon / Shutterstock

1. Forget 5-Hour Energy. The original pick-me-up may have come from the nomadic Oromo of Ethiopia, who made energy bars from ground coffee beans and animal fat sometime in the first millennium.

2.
Around A.D. 1000, Arab traders brought coffee beans home from Africa and started boiling them into a drink they called qahwa. Translation: “that which prevents sleep.”

3.
Fast-forward to the 1930s, when German physician Max Gerson began promoting daily coffee enemas to detoxify the liver, stimulate metabolism, and cure cancers.

4.
More recently, Britain’s Prince Charles has raved about coffee enemas, and Amazon.com sells DIY kits.

5.
But be warned: The National Cancer Institute says Gerson’s claims are unsupported, and the American Cancer Society cautions that illness and death can result from contaminated coffee enema equipment, depleted electrolytes, and punctured intestinal walls.

6.
Have a cup instead. In 2011, the Harvard School of Public Health reported that in a 22-year study of nearly 48,000 men, those drinking six or more cups daily were about 60 percent less likely to die from prostate cancer.

7.
A 2008 study at Sweden’s Lund University demonstrated that drinking coffee lowers the risk cheap MLB jerseys of breast cancer, at least for women who have a relatively common variant of the gene CYP1A2, which helps to metabolize both estrogen and coffee.

8.
wholesale jerseys But what really grabbed the public’s Hello attention that year was cup size. The same Swedish team found a correlation between women with the genetic variation who drink three or more cups of coffee a day and smaller breasts.

9.
Volume may assists be the least of coffee drinkers’ worries. In 2009, psychologists from the U.K.’s Durham University observed that students who drank three cups daily were three times more likely to hear voices and have out-of-body experiences.

coffee-beans
10. Bach voiced his love of coffee in a cantata. With libretto by Christian Friedrich Henrici, the Kaffeekantatewas first performed in Leipzig, Germany, sometime between 1732 and 1735.

11.
 “Father, don’t be so severe! / If I can’t drink / My bowl of coffee three times daily / Then in my torment I will shrivel up / Like a piece of roast goat,” goes the soprano part.

12.
 Americans, too, sing coffee’s praise. According to Harvard research, Americans spend $40 billion on coffee cheap NFL jerseys each year.

13.
 The world cheap NFL jerseys consumes close to 1.6 billion cups of coffee wholesale MLB jerseys every day.

14.
 A global phenomenon, the grande (or medium) 16-ounce coffee at Starbucks contains the caffeine equivalent of 9.5 cans of Coke.

15.
 It takes approximately 4,700 ounces, or 37 gallons, of water to make just one cup of coffee when you account for inputs needed to grow and process the beans.

16.
 Researchers from London’s Royal Botanic Gardens warn that highland forests in Ethiopia and South Sudan, where most wild coffee grows, are disappearing as mountaintops warm. By 2080, these moist ecosystems may be gone. It’s cause for concern, but not the end of coffee. The domesticated plant varieties we rely Fashion on for our joe are cheap MLB jerseys generally secure.

17.
 That is, until they are threatened by disease. Nearly 70 percent of the coffee we drink today comes from offshoots of wild Arabica, or Coffea arabica—the coffee species that stores most of the genetic information we need to re-engineer commercial cultivars.
 18. Coffea charrieriana, found in Cameroon, is the only known naturally decaffeinated coffee.

19.
 Coffee cherries—the fruit that bears our beloved beans—are a favorite snack of elephants, and the beans, or seeds, can be harvested, already hulled, from their dung. Smooth and caramel-tasting, elephant-dung coffee has been ?i Master known to sell for $500 a pound.

20.
 Think coffee makes your breath smell bad? In 2009 researchers at Tel Aviv University found that adding coffee to a dish of saliva inhibited the growth of a bacterium that causes halitosis. So go ahead, take a coffee break.
coffee-1lb-back-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockupcoffee-1lb-front-FOR-AMAZON-product-mockup